INTERMITTENT FASTING Tips from Nutritionist Brad Pilon and Dr. Edward Group

Brad Pilon defines “Intermittent Fasting” (“IF”) as a purposeful break from eating.  Dr. Edward Group defines it as alternating periods of fasting with periods of eating during the same day. If you think about it, we already do IF, because we fast when we go to sleep and we break that fast when we eat food the next day (unless we’re midnight snackers, which is bad!).

Are You Nutritionally Deficient?

A 2006 study of 70 healthy athletes, published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, found that food alone doesn’t get the body all the nutrients it body needs, and all of them were deficient in at least three critical items. If top athletes are nutrient deficient, what about the rest of us? The 7 Most Common Nutrient Deficiencies Worldwide, why are we so deficient? Why are we so deficient in key nutrients? Signs you may have nutrient deficiency.

EAT MORE AVOCADOS!

The avocado is the subject of a recent article by Joel Marion, CISSN (which means he is a Certified Sports Nutritionist from the International Society of Sports Nutrition). Here are some highlights of that excellent article. It’s the only fruit (yes, it’s a fruit, which used to be called “alligator pears”) with an unusually high amount of friendly fat, and it’s virtually sugar free! It’s loaded with dietary fiber, so it’s great for stabilizing blood glucose levels–meaning it’s great for us with diabetes and pre-diabetes. Since fluctuating blood sugar level is the hallmark trait of diabetes, we need to eat foods that help our condition. Avocados is a good stabilizer. Its high fiber content is great for helping to lower risk for heart disease, reduce the bad cholesterol, and raise the good cholesterol. A study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association recommends one avocado per day. It’s…

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Diabetes and Eggs

Diabetes and Eggs

A study performed at The University of Eastern Finland, and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, studied the diets of men aged 42 to 60, and followed them for 20 years on average to find out if they developed Diabetes. The study concluded that people who ate an average of 4 eggs per week had a 37% lower risk of developing type 2 Diabetes than people who only ate 1 egg per week.

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